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Photo by Keelin Murray

On a regular ongoing basis, Create staff will recommend an article, book, or performance that has caught their eye. 

For April 2019, we will focus on Delirium and Resistance: Activist Art and the Crisis of Capitalism, by Gregory Sholette, with an introduction by Kim Charnley and foreword by Lucy R. Lippard.

 In the aftermath of the 2016 US election, Brexit, and a global upsurge of nationalist populism, it is evident that the delirium and the crisis of neoliberal capitalism is now the delirium and crisis of liberal democracy and its culture. And though capitalist crisis does not begin within art, art can reflect and amplify its effects to positive and negative ends.

In this follow-up to his influential 2010 book, Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture, Sholette engages in critical dialogue with artists’ collectives, counter-institutions, and activist groups to offer an insightful first-hand account of the relationship between politics and art in neoliberal society. Sholette lays out clear examples of art’s deep involvement in capitalism: the dizzying prices achieved by artists who pander to the financial elite, the proliferation of museums that contribute to global competition between cities in order to attract capital, and the strange relationship between art and rampant gentrification that restructures the urban landscape.

With a preface by noted author Lucy R. Lippard and an introduction by theorist Kim Charnley, Delirium and Resistance draws on over thirty years of critical debates and practices both in and beyond the art world to historicize and advocate for the art activist tradition that radically - and, at times, deliriously - entangles the visual arts with political struggles. (Text from Pluto Press)

 

 

Gregory Sholette

Delirium and Resistance: Activist Art and the Crisis of Capitalism

Edited by Kim Charnley

2017: Pluto Press, 290pp

ISBN 9780745336886

 

Durty Words Book. Photo by Daniel Potts, Piquant Media.
Durty Words Book. Photo by Daniel Potts, Piquant Media. 

 

On a regular ongoing basis, Create staff will recommend an article, book, or performance that has caught their eye.

For January 2019, we will spotlight Durty Words: A space for dialogue, solidarity, resistance and creation. Edited and designed by Victoria Brunetta and Kate O’Shea, this book features 134 contributors, and is rich with illustration, photography, manifesto and original writing. The editors Brunetta and O’Shea began in 2016 by asking for responses to the relevance of Anarchist thought today. In recognition of the precarity and competition endemic to the arts globally, they created Durty Words as a space for solidarity and dialogue.  

The resulting book is confronting, disparate, and a pleasing physical item, unsurprising given the editors’ design credentials. The editors have sold 300 limited first edition copies to cover the cost of production, dissemination and books for the 134 contributors. Durty Words will continue 'as a platform for dialogue, solidarity, resistance and creation.'

 

Paperback, 368pp 
Durty Books Publishing House

Listen to Victoria Brunetta and Kate O’Shea speak to Séan Rocks on Arena, Monday 25th February 2019.

Read more and visit the Durty Words website.

What we made 

 

On a regular ongoing basis, Create staff will recommend an article, book, or performance that has caught their eye.

This time, we’re focusing on What We Made: Conversations on Art and Social Cooperation, by Tom Finkelpearl.

In What We Made, Tom Finkelpearl examines the activist, participatory, co-authored aesthetic experiences being created in contemporary art. He suggests social cooperation as a meaningful way to think about this work and provides a framework for understanding its emergence and acceptance. In a series of fifteen conversations, artists comment on their experiences working cooperatively, joined at times by colleagues from related fields, including social policy, architecture, art history, urban planning, and new media. Issues discussed include the experiences of working in public and of working with museums and libraries, opportunities for social change, the lines between education and art, spirituality, collaborative opportunities made available by new media, and the elusive criteria for evaluating cooperative art. Finkelpearl engages the art historians Grant Kester and Claire Bishop in conversation on the challenges of writing critically about this work and the aesthetic status of the dialogical encounter. He also interviews the often overlooked co-creators of cooperative art, "expert participants" who have worked with artists. In his conclusion, Finkelpearl argues that pragmatism offers a useful critical platform for understanding the experiential nature of social cooperation, and he brings pragmatism to bear in a discussion of Houston's Project Row Houses.

 

What We Made is published by Duke University Press
Paperback, 388 pages
ISBN: 9780822352891

Learning In Public: TransEuropean Collaborations In Socially Engaged Art. Image: Joseph Carr. 
Image: Joseph Carr

 

On a regular ongoing basis, Create staff will recommend an article, book, or performance that has caught their eye.
Our inaugural featured publication is Learning In Public: TransEuropean Collaborations In Socially Engaged Art.

Reflecting on the first four years of the Collaborative Arts Partnership Programme (CAPP), Learning in Public: transEuropean Collaborations in Socially Engaged Art offers a series of provocations on the role of collaborative and socially engaged arts. As well as providing a record of CAPP’s activities between 2014 and 2018, Learning in Public features contributions from the thinkers and writers Mick Wilson, Eleonora Belfiore, Aida Sánchez de Serdio Martín and Susanne Bosch, and a series of dialogues between CAPP partners and artists.

In presenting a breadth of perspectives, Learning in Public articulates the diversity of practice and approach to collaborative arts, offering difficult questions to a cultural sector facing rapid and substantial change across Europe.

 

Learning in Public is edited by Eleanor Turney, designed by David Caines, and produced by Create and the Live Art Development Agency, 2018.
Various authors (English)
Paperback, colour illustrations included throughout 160 pages, 21 cm x 17 cm.
ISBN: 978-0-9935611-7-7

Purchase your copy from Unbound.

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